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How Sporting Podcasts Have Blindsided Traditional Media

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When thinking about the most widely covered American sports it’s the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals, and the World Series that immediately spring to mind. However, there is a myriad of other lesser known sports too that all have their own niche online audiences consisting of fans that are even more passionate than those of the more traditional sports.

All sports have one thing in common; which is the rise of sports podcasting and how it’s bringing fans together in a way that has never been seen before on TV and radio. Sports junkies are united in their passion, so it should be of no surprise that more and more fans are broadcasting their unique voice online.

Both podcast broadcasters and listeners are forming their own digital tribes to create online communities where they can voice their thoughts and opinions while also including listeners via Skype interviews or virtual voicemails to engage in a meaningful and authentic way.

Anyone thinking of creating their own sporting podcast is already halfway there armed with just the idea alone. If you can also be your true self and be opinionated about the sport you are so passionate about, then you are ready to record and publish.

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TV companies have been proudly showcasing the latest technology along with the glitz and glamour glitz and glamour of our favourite sports.  We now have multi-channels, footage from every game and instant replays on demand to ensure nobody ever misses out on the action.

However, whilst networks heavily invest in technology they seemed to have neglected the most important aspect of attending any sporting event. The communal atmosphere that includes the exchange of opinions or banter which is what makes attending the game so special and frequently more enjoyable than the event itself.

Traditional media has been so busy telling us how everything is, that they have been completely blindsided by new media where there is a real-time dialogue between fans in an authentic voice that resonates with their experiences of attending a big game.

The friendly exchange of opinions on the subway, walking to the stadium or at your seat is what we love about the big games. We sure don’t miss paying $8 for a Bud Light and $15 for a steak sandwich, but feeling a part of something for just a few hours, where even strangers will listen attentively to your opinion is the special sauce that is often missing.

There are a number of fantastic sporting podcasts here on Spreaker that cover just about every sport that you can think of and more importantly encourage all listeners to be a part of the show.

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After listening to some of the great sporting podcasts available, it will only be a matter of time until you ponder creating your own show. We have all yelled at a TV screen during sporting broadcasts, but is this enough for you to create your own successful show?

The truth is that is takes a little skill and preparation, but if you know what value you can bring to your audience and what you want to say, there really is no limit to what you can achieve.

Anyone thinking of starting their own sporting podcast should take a few pointers from the Marlin Family Live show that proudly that their transmission is for the fans, by the fans, to talk about all things Miami Marlins and finally “Join the Marlin Family and let your voice be heard!”

The synopsis is refreshingly honest and simple with a strong community vibe where the listener’s voice is as important as the broadcasters themselves. For me personally this encapsulates the ethos of podcasts and live broadcasts in this age where new media is leading the way.

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The only ingredient you really need to get the ball rolling is to have a subject matter that you are passionate about. If you genuinely love what you are doing and are clearly podcasting your passion, your audience will be able to hear this in your voice.

Meanwhile, the Bob Sullivan is the perfect night sports radio program that the host describes as a conversation with athletes, celebrities, and his friends. Once again, this illustrates how the secret to an engaged audience is the communal bond between audiences and podcasters.

Traditional media has long struggled to obtain the level of engagement that is almost taken for granted with podcasting. Although, when was the last time you saw a TV show aimed at well-educated social sharers?

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Many podcast listeners are turning away from the dumb down offerings on TV. Modern digital natives are guided by their natural curiosity about the world around them and are armed with an only insatiable appetite for learning.

Whatever your interests are in this life, you will find a friendly voice in front of a microphone that wants to hear your thoughts too. This is just one of the many reasons why a podcasting platform is a perfect home for any sporting show.

Passionate fans are creating niche communities where every listener can voice their thoughts and viewpoints on just about any sport that you can name. Where else can you find a completely undiluted flow of information in its purest sense?

The only remaining questions are why it has taken so long for people to understand the power of this medium and why you have not created your own show yet. So what are you waiting for?

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2 Comments
  • Gary Williams Sep 17,2015 at 11:33 am

    This is very true! I have a boxing podcast here on Spreaker called Boxing Along The Beltway and it has been a godsend as I have used it for podcast as well as live broadcasts of boxing cards in the Washington, DC area!

  • Dann Dunn Aug 31,2015 at 2:18 am

    A great article and thank you for the mention! Anyone who wants to do a Podcast, Spreaker platform is the best way to get your show heard. Thanks Spreaker for such a great platform to post our Podcast. Special thanks to all of our fans and future fans for tuning in. Let’s Go Fish and happy Podcasting everyone!

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